Peace Operations

- “Protecting Civilians: Key Determinants in the Effectiveness of a Peacekeeping Force" .University of Pittsburgh Ford Institute for Human Security (2009).
This final report is the culmination of an extended research project that produced four additional reports, listed below. It examines eight conflicts in seven African countries to find the determinants of successful and unsuccessful peacekeeping operations. Findings and charts from this paper were published in the article "Soldiers of Misfortune" in the March 2009 edition of Foreign Policy. Click here to view the full report.

By Daniel S. Carik, Megan Carniewski - “Simply a Matter of Timing? Examining the Effectiveness of Peacekeeper Deployment During Different Phases of a Conflict”.University of Pittsburgh Ford Institute for Human Security (2008).
Ford Institute for Human Security second policy brief regarding the effectiveness of peacekeepers in protecting displaced persons and refugees, entitled Simply a Matter of Timing? Examining the Effectiveness of Peacekeeper Deployment During Different Phases of a Conflict. This report reflects findings drawn from the third phase of an expansive, continued study, funded by the United States Institute of Peace.

By Penelope Bissett, Christopher P. Farnsworth - “Does Deployment Matter? Examining the Conditions under which Peacekeeping Missions Effectively Protect Displaced Persons and Refugees”.University of Pittsburgh Ford Institute for Human Security (2008).
Ford Institute for Human Security first policy brief regarding the effectiveness of peacekeepers in protecting displaced persons and refugees, entitled Does Deployment Matter? Examining the Conditions under which Peacekeeping Missions Effectively Protect Displaced Persons and Refugees. This report reflects findings drawn from the third phase of an expansive, continued study, funded by the United States Institute of Peace.

By Pamela S. Daley, Owen Foley - “Does Force Composition Matter? Determining if the Relative Homogeneity of a Peacekeeping Operation Leads to Decreased Attacks on Civilians” .University of Pittsburgh Ford Institute for Human Security (2008).
Ford Institute for Human Security third policy brief regarding the effectiveness of peacekeepers in protecting displaced persons and refugees, entitled Does Force Composition Matter?, it determines if the relative homogeneity of a peacekeeping operation leads to decreased attacks on civilians. This report reflects findings drawn from the third phase of an expansive, continued study, funded by the United States Institute of Peace.

By Daniel S. Carik - “Porous Borders and the Insecurity of Civilians: Cross-border Violence in Darfur and Eastern Chad".University of Pittsburgh Ford Institute for Human Security (2008).
Ford Institute for Human Security third policy brief regarding the effectiveness of peacekeepers in protecting displaced persons and refugees, entitled Does Force Composition Matter?, it determines if the relative homogeneity of a peacekeeping operation leads to decreased attacks on civilians. This report reflects findings drawn from the third phase of an expansive, continued study, funded by the United States Institute of Peace.

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